Space & Space Resources


The global student design competition addresses a topic of increasing practical concern as humans move toward a sustainable presence on the Moon’s surface — how to move lunar soil, or regolith.
"ASPECT will lay the groundwork for the surface construction and mining on other worlds," says Christopher Dreyer, professor in Mines' Space Resources Graduate Program.
Five university teams from around the world descended on the Mines campus June 2-3 to demonstrate the systems they designed and built for moving lunar dirt, or regolith, around the Moon’s surface.
A new frontier in lunar technology will be on display June 2-3 in a parking lot on the edge of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains.
Why did you choose to come to Mines? What have you enjoyed most about being here? Originally I chose Mines based on its reputation and my desire to become an engineer. I've now chosen Mines twice more
George Sowers, a professor in the Space Resources Program at Colorado School of Mines, has been appointed to serve on the Human Exploration and Operations (HEO) Committee of the NASA Advisory Council.
“For Mines to win the medal count really cements our position in this industry,” Professor George Sowers said. “The team that won the overall prize was a pretty large aerospace corporation – we had graduate students that went toe to toe with a professional company.”
Colorado School of Mines, in partnership with Lockheed Martin Space, announce a new global student design challenge open to student teams from any accredited university worldwide.
A team of Colorado School of Mines students have received funding from NASA to design and test a near-term solution to one of the biggest (smallest) challenges to future lunar exploration: Moon dust.
A Colorado School of Mines graduate student is developing a new lunar payload that could be deployed to otherwise inaccessible areas of the Moon.