Humanities & Design


The Peace Corps Prep certificate program at Mines, the first of its kind for engineering students in Colorado, prepares students for international development work.
Winning the semester-long design challenge – and the $1,000 grand prize – was a solution to improve spatial awareness for hearing impaired cyclists.
Using computer vision, artificial intelligence and radar, the gestr Hazard Notification System not only allows the cyclist to know danger is ahead, but where the danger is coming from.
Despite weighing nearly four times more than the average canoe, the Mines Concrete Canoe team has no plans to join Davy Jones’ locker after their performance in April.
Charles Shultz ’61 and his wife, Louanne, have provided a generous gift to Mines’ Humanitarian Engineering program to support the program’s continued growth, reach and impact inside and outside the university.
The J. Don ’55 and Lois Thorson Capstone Lab will provide a dedicated space for Capstone Design@Mines projects.
One of the earliest cyberattacks on a university happened right here at Colorado School of Mines more than 20 years ago. It was this attack that inspired Elizabeth Van Wie Davis, professor of international politics and policy in the Division of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, to write her newest book, “Shadow Warfare: Cyberwar Policy in the United States, Russia, and China.”
Winning the semester-long design challenge was a solution to improve adherence to COVID-19 capacity limits in restaurants, retail stores and other spaces.
Gracie Cole '20 tells us about her Capstone Design project—converting her 1979 VW bus from gas to electric.
Re-Volt’s goal was to retain the van’s road trip and car camping capabilities while aiming for a 250-mile range and comfortable highway cruising speed of 70 mph.